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When you and your spouse get a divorce, you usually have to figure out a custody arrangement. There are many different ways a court might award custody. It is important to understand the different arrangements, as well as what might be in the best interests of your child. 

A court usually orders either joint or sole custody. LiveAbout.com says that joint custody means both you and your ex-spouse can take care of your child and make decisions for him or her. If a court orders sole custody, then your child usually lives with only one of you. You may think that sole custody means you will not see your child again. However, many courts award visitation hours for non-custodial parents. 

When a court awards joint custody to you and your ex-spouse, this arrangement may take a few different forms. If you have physical custody, then your child usually lives with you. Legal custody refers to your ability to make decisions about your child’s life, such as the kind of health care and education he or she receives. Sometimes a court might award physical and legal custody to both parents. In certain situations, though, a court might give physical custody to you and your ex-spouse but give legal custody to only one of you. 

It is important to remember that your particular situation determines the custody arrangement you receive. A court usually looks at several factors to decide what will be best for your son or daughter. If your child is older, someone might ask if he or she has a custody preference. Additionally, people typically consider whether you and your ex-spouse are willing to work together to raise your child. Your ability to provide for your child can also be a factor. You can find more information about this subject on our webpage.